In-Person Candidate Forum -- Olympia Mayor

On July 12, 2019, an in-person forum for the office of Mayor of Olympia was co-hosted by the Thurston County League of Women Voters and The Olympian.  The four candidates were asked a series of questions predetermined by the LWVTC, as well as questions from the audience.  

The candidates are, from left to right in this picture:  tbp

A video-tape recording of the forum will be available at this site soon.

 

 

 


Streams, Salmon, and Orcas

 

Where’s the Water: Streams, Salmon & Orcas 

The final community meeting to explore this topic and collect information for the update of the LWVTC Water Study was held on May 7, 2019.   Click here to see a Video of this meeting.

Paula Holroyde, Water Study Committee Chair, welcome folks to the Olympia Center and thanks all who have made the Water Study Public Meetings such a success. 

 

 NOVA MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS:  WATER QUALITY STUDIES

 

ANN MARIE PEARCE, Education Outreach Specialist, Thurston County Planning Water Division: “HOW CLEAN IS YOUR STREAM?

GABE MADEL, Fish Biologist, Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife: “WHAT’S HAPPENING WITH SALMON IN THURSTON COUNTY?”

 

 KIRSTEN HARMA, Lead Entity Coordinator, Chehalis Basin Partnership, Department of Natural Resources, Chehalis Tribe:  “CURRENT STRATEGIES TO ENHANCE SALMON HABITAT RESTORATION”

CINDY HANSON, Education Coordinator, Orca Network, Whidbey Island, Washington: “WHAT ARE WE DOING TO PROTECT OUR ENDANGERED ORCAS?”

 

To find out more about the Thurston League's involvement in Thurston County water issues, please take a look at our water study page by clicking here.              

 

 


Storm Water and Toxic Runoff

Water Study Public Meeting 4

Where's The Water: Storm Water and Toxic Runoff  ---  April 2, 2019

This meeting drew a somewhat different crowd, with its focus on storm water, watersheds, and permitting processes.  A video recording of this meeting can be viewed HERE.

Here are pictures of the speakers, as well as co-sponsors who were available to give information and answer questions.

 

Chris Wilke, Executive Director, Puget Soundkeeper, and Art Starry, R.S., Environmental Health Division, Thurston County Public Health and Social Services, listen while waiting to present.

 

Jana Ratcliff, Program Manager, Stormwater and Watersheds, WA Dept. of Transportation, talks about the need for permitting of new roadways or retrofitting existing pavement.

 

   

Abbey Stockwell, Senior Stormwater Planner, WA Dept of speaks on the impact of Municipal Permitting.  

          


Water Study Public Meeting 3

Where’s the Water: Rural Water Challenges & Solutions – March 19, 2019

The third public meeting on aspects of Thurston County's water supply took a rural turn.  An enthusiastic crowd met in Yelm to hear speakers talk about issues unique to rural residents of the county.

 

Mayor JW Foster talked about water resource planning going on in Yelm.  This "center of the universe"  has been attracting residents for hundred of years, with no signs of slowing down. Accommodation to population increases demands thoughtful planning. 

Mary Verner, Department of Ecology Water Resources Division Program Manager, provided the "nuts and bolts of water rights permits."   Again, population growth is a pivotal factor in actions being taken by her Division.  The importance of Watershed Plans being developed was stressed by Ms. Verner.

 

The fact that "farms" come in all sizes and varieties, from house plants to mega-farms and ranches, was the opening point of Glen Schorno.  He is a Dairyman from Yelm, and his remarks were related to agriculture water needs.  One of his major points is that technology is now a key factor in enabling more efficient use of water. 

The final speaker of the evening, Nora White, Education and Outreach Coordinator for the Thurston Conservation District (TCD), provided a range of voluntary and non-regulatory solutions to water management. Land owners are able to get direct education and technical assistance from TCD through their localized and hands-on approaches.                                             

 

 

 

 

 

A video containing each of the presentations can be viewed by checking here


Water Study Public Meeting 2

Where’s the Water: Water for People, Water for Fish – March 5, 2019

Another standing room crowd listened and learned about a range of aspect of Thurston County's water supply.

 

Speakers George Walter, Environmental Program Supervisor, Nisqually Indian Tribe; Marc Daily, Executive Director, Thurston Regional Planning Council; and Maia Bellon, Director, Department of Ecology talked about history, current circumstances, and prospects for the future.  

A video of the evening program is presented here in three parts:

Part 1 is 42 minutes long. 

Part 2 is 24 minutes long.

Part 3 is 36 minutes long 

 

And click here for a video: mitigating for permit-exempt wells in the Nisqually watershed 


Water Study Public Meeting 1

Where’s the Water: Reality Check – February 5, 2019

Yes, it was a standing only crowd for the 1st of five Water Study public meetings. Certainly the excellent front page article in The Olympian, meeting sponsor, was a draw.  The presence of other sponsors contributed to the informative evening.

                 

Moderator, former Senator, Karen Fraser set the stage with eye opening information about the portion of water that is actually available it for human use. Listen to her remarks by clicking here.

Her remarks were followed by presentations by two first-rate presenters, Kevin Hansen, County Hydrogeologist, Thurston County Water Resources, and David Troutt, Natural Resources Director for the Nisqually Indian Tribe.

   Mr Hanen explained where Thurston County water comes from and the challenges to maintaining adequate supply.  He pointed to the promise of a set of watershed plans for Thurston County Water Resource Inventory Areas (WRIA).  Find his remarks here. 

 

 

Mr. Troutt, who was instrumental in the development of the first approved plan, for the Nisqually watershed, spoke ab out the plan.  He also talked about the impact of I-5 crossing the Nisqually in terms of economy, salmon recovery, and national security.  Here are his remarks.


2018 Education Fund Benefit Luncheon

The Education Fund Luncheon, held at the Indian Summers Country Club on October 20, 2018, was a great success.  

This is our annual fundraising event, as well as an opportunity to hear inspiring words from a governmental leader, present an award to an individual who has made a difference in our community, and generally celebrate our work.

LWV-TC10-20-2018EdFundLunch-6.jpg

Our guest speaker was Kim Wyman, Washington State Secretary of State centered her remarks on “Securing the Electoral Process.” Secretary Wyman shared her insights and stressed the urgency of addressing cyber-security and other                    LWV-TC10-20-2018EdFundLunch-7.jpg

threats to our election safety and security.  It was gratifying to hear that Washington ranks highly in our election security.  In light of the League’s dedication to non-partisanship, attendees especially appreciated Secretary Wyman’s assertions that while a candidate may run as a partisan to get elected, an elected official must work for all people afterward.


The 2018 Citizen Achievement Award was presented to Dr. Allyson Brooks, the Washington State Director of Antiquities and Historic Preservation. Additional information about this award and Dr. Brooks can be found by clicking here.

League members and friends attending the Luncheon found opportunities to mingle and visit – at check-in while The Burren Band provided lively music, during lunch, and while checking out Silent Auction items.       

The bargain filled Silent AuctionLWV-TC10-20-2018EdFundLunch-2.jpg was held this year to raise funds for our League’s operating account.      



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